Info Bites: Salt to shield you

English below.

[GR] Αυτός ο κώνος από αλάτι λέγεται morishio 盛塩 και το είδα πρώτη φορά προχτές. Το αλάτι, λόγω της δυσκολίας παρασκευής του, θεωρούνταν πολύτιμο και γι’ αυτό δίνεται ως προσφορά στους θεούς όπως το σάκε και το ρύζι. Ακόμα, είναι λευκό και άρα θεωρείται ότι έχει εξαγνιστικές ιδιότητες. Παραμένει ακόμα το έθιμο όποιος επιστρέφει από νυχτερινή εργασία ή κηδεία να πασπαλίζει λίγο αλάτι πριν μπει στο σπίτι. Μπορεί κανείς να βάλει έναν κώνο από αλάτι στην είσοδο του σπιτιού, επειδή πιστεύεται ότι σχηματίζει μια ασπίδα προστασίας του εσωτερικού από τα “κακά” που βρίσκονται στον έξω κόσμο. Τις προάλλες είδα στις δύο πλευρές της εισόδου ενός εστιατορίου δύο κώνους αλατιού κάτω από ένα σετ komainu (狛犬), που επίσης λειτουργούν σαν φύλακες του σπιτού. Στη συγκεκριμένη περίπτωση, μάλλον ήταν για να προσκαλέσουν μέσα στο μαγαζί πλούσιους πελάτες. Ένα Ιάπωνας φίλος σχολίασε ότι “είναι κοντό”, και εγώ ακόμα επεξεργαζόμουν το γιατί κυκλοφορεί χύμα άλατι στους δρόμους. Παραδίπλα βέβαια, κρέμονταν κάτι λωτοί προς αποξήρανση, καμία σχέση με έθιμο.

[EN] This cone of salt is called morishio (盛塩) and I came across it for the first time a few days ago. In the past, salt was extremely valuable, and as a result it was offered to the gods together with sake and rice. Salt supposedly has purifying properties, thus it used to be common to sprinkle some when returning from a funeral or from late night work. It can be placed at the entrance of the house, individually or as a pair, in order to create a barrier and protect the interior of the house from the evils of the outside. I saw a pair of morishio placed directly under a pair of komainu (狛犬) which also serve as guardians at an entrance of a restaurant. In this case it might mean that they placed it in order to invite wealthy customers inside. My Japanese friend even commented that “this one is short”, so I wonder how tall a salt cone can be in that case.

Persimmons drying in the sun, next to the restaurants entrance

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: